Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Innominate colors 2

Here is the mixing of innominate colors I described to you last night. I described the colors that re not identifiable with a name like red, blue violet or green as innominate. That is, they have no names. I generally mix them from three primaries. I could build them from earth colors or black plus some chromatic colors, but this is the basic way I do it. The three colors above are Sennelier red, cadmium yellow and cobalt blue.

Here I have mixed them roughly together. I don't want to mix them to much as I want variations in the colors that I can pull from this pile. I can get a whole lot of different and varied notes by using different parts of the pile, one side gives me redder notes another yellower etc.

14 comments:

Deb said...

WELL, I am counting on the principle that "all color is no color". Stuck here away from home, with no paints and going nuts with nothing to do, I ordered a few painting supplies. My budget limited my choices, and I decided to go with pretty much a Zorn palette.. so I'll be mixing lots of neutrals, not chromatic, but still the same idea. Now the question is, can I paint with my arm in a sling?

billspaintingmn said...

To answer your question from the last post, Yes I got Gurneys book, and I'm doing the trip.

Antonin said...

Thanks Stape for this practical advise.

Rick said...

Great blog - very helpful advice, including the tip on Gurney's book which is superb. A trivial point - the medical term is spelled Innominate with two n's to start.

Tim said...

Hey Stape, do you find that the Sennelier Cads are extraordinary fast dryers, for cads? They'll stiffen up over night for me, and be rendered useless on the palette if left for more than 2 days.

Lucy said...

Would that be a pyrol red or a cadmium red? Whichever it is it's a good concept!

Stapleton Kearns said...

Deb;
I hope you recover soon. A Zorn palette is all you really need. Good luck with that sling problem.
...................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

bill:
I have enjoyed studying my copy. There is a lot in there.
.................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Antonin:
You are welcome.
.......................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Rick;
I am so embarrassed. That's the problem with this blog, no editor. Oh well,it is a primitive labor of love and unwitting error. I did go back and fix the spelling.I actually looked it up and still spelled it wrong. All the errors are out there just waiting to be made. They preexist their commission. Thanks for the tip.
............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Tim;
The only color of theirs I use is that red. I have had their cadmiums but don't remember having a problem with them.
.................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Lucy,
I retubed it and don't remember what pigment it is. I had it laying around. I have about a zillion tubes of red of every sort and I am always experimenting with them. I don't go through red that feast and I have vast stockpiles.
.............Stape

Reece Hancock said...

I am reading Edgar Payne's "Composition of Outdoor Painting" and this makes me think of his "soup" mixture. In the book, he mentions Indian Red, Ultramarine Blue and Yellow. "This dark can be modified with other colors to suit the color scheme or with white to suit the value scale."

jeremy said...

Now I am thoroughly confused. In a previous blog post in the colors section, there is an explanation about RBY mixing to make black. Now, on this post, RBY is making grey. Could someone please explain the reason why?