Friday, February 25, 2011

Some valuable modern art

The following ARE NOT a part of my 100 paintings and artist should know and are presented as examples of important modern art.


The Fountain; submitted but not actually shown to an exhibition of the Society of Independent Artists.It is a commercially produced urinal, laid on its back. The original was lost, but it's maker (finder?) Marcel Duchamp created a number of replicas that were exhibited in the 50's and 1960's . These are on display at the Tate Museum, The San Fransisco Museum of Modern Art, at the Pompidou Center in Paris and at the Philadelphia Musuem of art. In 1999 one of these replicas brought 1.7 million dollars at a Sothebys auction. 500 top art experts in England voted it the most important work of art of the twentieth century.

Above is pictured a can of well.......artist's fecal matter. Done by Italian artist Piero Manzoni in 1961. It is one of an edition of ninety and brought 124,000 Euros at auction in 2007. One of the cans while displayed at the Randers Museum in Denmark began to leak. Evidently the smell was horrific. The collector who owned it was furious and the museum although insisting the work leaked in their possession only by coincidence, had it carefully restored. Ultimately the collector was paid 50,00 Euros and the museum kept the can of well........................


My Bed, an installation by Tracy Emin was exhibited at the Tate in London. It is her actual bed and other items brought as they were in her home and reassembled in the gallery. The objects include used condoms, bloody undergarments and her slippers. The piece was sold to Charles Saatchi for 150,00 Euros. It was shown in his gallery and then installed in a special room in his own home.( I suppose its lovely, but it simply won't go with the Hepplewhite, Mr. Saatchi!)

Woman III by Wilhelm DeKooning . Dekooning was presented the National Medal of Honor for his contribution to art, by President Lyndon Johnson. This painting was sold for 137 million dollars.

36 comments:

Jason Daniel Jackson Fine Art said...

I really like these history post. The detailed stories along with the different paintings is so interesting. I look forward to more.

T Arthur Smith said...

I see a connection but not an argument. Is this part of your 100 artworks all artists should know? =)

Stapleton Kearns said...

Jason;
Thank you.
................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

T. Arthur;
These are not part of that series and I have returned to the post and added that disclaimer.I think the presentation of these works shows what we value in art at the level of museums and the high end art market.
..................Stape

Barbara said...

This is the way you're brilliant. Because I'm really rather ecumenical in my fondness of art, and it kind of pisses me off when traditional figurative artists belittle modern art (and vice versa). But you post illustrations like these, and let them speak for themselves.

T Arthur Smith said...

Okay, I feel a little sorry for deKooning, though.

Simone said...

I'm sorry, but people with money to spend on stuff like this should not be allowed to have money.

Mary Byrom said...

Excellent post Stapleton. Modern art? Classical art? Forget any "conversation about art and its value" ... just show the art...well done!

Durinda Cheek, Fine Artist said...

I like the manner you presented the modern artworks. As instructors, it is not our place to condemn or defend works of art, but merely show them for what they are. In this case, they are "firsts". They say, "anything we say is art, is art".

Richard J. Luschek II said...

I am curious as to one thing based on some of the comments here. Why do we have no problem giving honest criticisms of the other arts. If you saw a music performance that was not good or skilled you would get up and walk out and tell all of your friends how dreadful it was. Bad movies are trashed by the critics. If an architect builds something that falls down, it is generally frowned upon.
Why is "painting and sculpture" exempt from such treatment?
It is a good post, but I wonder from the comments why we are not allowed to point it out when the 'emperor isn't wearing any clothes!'
I too have really been enjoying these history posts.

mariandioguardi.com said...

Good, bad, failed, sublime, whatever you think of these pieces, they are a part of art history and we can't ignore their existence. The emperor may not be wearing clothes, but just because one cannot see it, it doesn't mean that it doesn't effect us. Like gravity, which you can't see but it influences us everyday, these works exert a strong influence in our art world. It is what it is.

T Arthur Smith said...

The Duchamp and the Manzoni are intellectual/pseudo-philosophical exercises. The quality/worth comes from the conversation you get out of them, so your own intellect comes into play.

The Emin and DeKooning fall more under the heading of personal expression, the DeKooning bypassing rational imagery, the Emin bypassing artistic media. So, their quality/worth comes from the extent that you feel them.

These are different approaches to art making, skipping the appealing and leaping (over a huge chasm) to try to reach profundity. Quality still exists in art and these famous works may or may not be successful. But regardless, comparing them to Rembrandt or Da Vinci makes as much sense as comparing them to aftershave or bug spray.

Stephanie Berry said...

Okay, I was looking for the "like" button under Richard's comments. My first thought on this post was "a fool and his money are soon parted". My second thought was I need to find some fool to part with his money on my art. Heck, mine will never stink.

Moose said...

I have to agree with Stephanie, Richard's comments are spot on. Well said, sir.

JonInFrance said...

Not even destined for the footnotes. I'd rather one of my own poor honest efforts. What satisfaction to think you were a successful fraud?

Deborah Paris said...

What Richard said.

Casey Klahn said...

What Deborah said.

I reserve the right to say what I like.

Stapeliad said...

Damien Hirst should be on this list too.

Paul Birnbaum said...

I see this post slightly differently. I don't see a direct relationship between the cost of a work of art and it's long-lasting quality. Van Gogh only sold one painting in his life - so one might say, in his day, his art was near worthless. Today we treasure it. In future years it may be cast aside as childish. Is there such a thing as absolute quality? Look at music: Mozart is likely to be always valued. Disco . . . maybe not. The urinal art may make a big splash today (pun intended), but I doubt it will be highly valued as quality art in years to come. That doesn't mean it can't be appreciated today and that some fool won't pay uber-bucks for it.

MCG said...

What Monroe Beardsley said.

Stapleton Kearns said...

Barbara:
Thanks. I wonder if you will still think so tomorrow.
...........Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Artur;
DeKooning can fend for himself.
...........Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Simone:
There may be a disconnect between the possession of money and the development of taste.
............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Mary;
Thanks.
.............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Durinda;
Every sound I make is music.
................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Richard;
Tonight the emperor is wearing a bullwhip!
...............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Marian;
I am posting them because they are a part of art history, lest they be ignored.
.............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Stephanie;
Its a strange world.
.................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Moose;
Hi there!
.............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Jon;
I don't know.
................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Deborah;
One more in the Richard column.
.............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Casey;
Duly noted.
...............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Stapeliad;
Tonight he is.
...........Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Paul;
There does seem to be some surprises on the value of art.
................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

MCG;
I don't know I have read some about that, and it hasn't helped me any.I might not be smart enough.
............Stape

Christopher Thornock said...

Looks like someone has been watching Roger Scruton, and if not, you should.