Thursday, June 23, 2011

Hard on the top, soft on the bottom 2


Here is a 9 by 12 sketch demonstrating the hard on the top, soft on the bottom idea. It was done transparently with ultramarine and a little black. I forced myself to used the gradation formed by pulling the tones down from the edges all over. I then free associated the forms of waves out of the resulting goo.

Everywhere I have drawn the top of a wave I have gradated below it automatically. I also placed as many lines as I could against a light part of the gradation of the wave behind. The drawing grew organically like a doodle.

Making up water, not copying it from a photo is great training in building form and handling gradation.

13 comments:

billspaintingmn said...

Stape! If that's a doodle, it's a dandy!
Once that dries, would you glaze over it?
You never cease to amaze me, You are a wizard!

mariandioguardi.com said...

hmm.. Seems like that ditty could be used to describe women too! Just saying....

OK enough of that. Back to serious matters.

Water, clouds...how about forests (lots of trees)?

Do some constructs work the other way; hard on the bottom and soft on top? Just asking....

willek said...

Black and ultramarine?? Where do those warm tones come from? Warm black? and all the lights are the white of the panel showing through? Nice picture. maybe a little man in a boat in there gaffing a giant squid.

Deborah Paris said...

Love this Stape- but then I'm always a push over for transparent paint...

James Gunter said...

This demo sketch reminds me of a painting I saw in the Springville Museum of Art, "The Open Sea" by Frederick J. Waugh.

http://www.springvilleartmuseum.org/collections/browse.html?x=art&art_id=655&name=The_Open_Sea

No ships, no boats, no seabirds, no shore. Just lots of ocean...

But to the point, Waugh's painting shows the same kind of gradation.

Gary L. Everest Paintings said...

Hi Stape,
I've looked at this several times now and can hardly grasp the complexity of this amazing work disguised as a simple illustration of the principle.
It's the perfect example of what a great work of art should be.
I'm really struggling to say something profound, but truth-be-told, it's not required.
This is a painting I would spend years studying and perhaps more importantly, enjoying.
Bravo!
Sincerely,
Gary.

Mary Byrom said...

Good question Willek, where is that warm golden color coming from?

Stapleton Kearns said...

I doodle in waves.
............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

mariandioguardi.com
The effect can be used in a lot of ways, in fact i sometimes ask myself if each passage would benefit from it, rather than an ordinary softened edge. I have a little checklist.
...............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

willek;
The ivory black is warmer than the ultramarine. No squids.
............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Deborah Paris;
I don't paint transparently very much except as lay ins.
...............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Where is Springville?
................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Gary L. Everest Paintings ;
Thanks. I do have big ego problems, you know.
............Stape