Sunday, February 14, 2010

Ramalama, wipadudu bootie! Ut Ut.

Above is an Emile Gruppe. I posted a Gruppe the other night, I ran into this painting while I was looking for that. This is an exciting loose painting that compels you up through its center in a rythmical chimney of pointing lines and shapes perspecting upwards. The eaves of the red shack are a big arrow, also pointing the same direction.

I am not always fond of paintings this loose, and I don't want to make paintings like it, I do like this one. I have always liked Gruppe's work in reproduction more than in the flesh. Shrinking them down tightens them up a bit. I am very fond of Anthony Thieme's paintings. He did the same sort of thing, at the same time a few miles away in Rockport or traveling about the Americas. He had a little more finish, although they must sometimes have been painted with a house painters brush.

There is a book on Thieme available from the Rockport Art Association in Rockport Mass. I guess I am getting ahead of myself tonight. I promised you I would continue with the history of American landscape painting, and I will soon. I guess this is a preview of coming attractions, ultimately I will show the regional art of my grandfathers generation. These guys died off in the 60's and 70's.

One advantage of painting really loose is that you can do designs that don't seem to survive a tightening" of the painting. Painters who work really loose make lot of starts. Starts are the part of the painting where the image is designed. Since loose painters make lots of starts, they often get very good at design.

Ramalama, wipadudu bootie! Ut Ut.

34 comments:

Simone said...

Another virgin blog for me to be the first to comment on....

Loose painters make a lot of starts. Does that imply that they have a lower batting average? Fewer finishes?

That Thiemes is very Florida looking.

mariandioguardi.com said...

It's Allgloryrythm - a Jeff Beck riff.

Allgoreyrythm - a Jimi Hendrix riff.

Honor Martinez said...

I am happy to hear that many loose starts can improve the artist's design. I am committing to 100 small plein air paintings and one of my weaknesses is design so here's hoping!!!

Tim Fitzgerald said...

I try to be loose in my painting technique however, my pictures end up less so.But I'm usually happy with the results. I do admire their bravery and elan. Your work seems right in that middle zone with just enough spontaneity and just the right amount of finish. Must be all those miles of canvas we hear so much about!! Tim Fitz

Knitting Out Loud said...

Okay, Ramalama, wipadudu bootie! Ut Ut to you, too. Hope you're on your way!

billspaintingmn said...

I enjoy loose paintings, if the brushstrokes are controled.
I enjoy tight paintings if the subject matter is fun.
A good design is an art piece in itself.
I'm still learning so Ramalama, Ramalama Rock-n-Roll is King!
Happy Valentines Day!!

Philip Koch said...

Stapleton's observation that loosely painted starts often produce great new design ideas is right on target.

One thing I've found helpful is to do very small versions of major paintings I envision painting. I keep the little one's purposely loose, and sometimes will try out two or three different directions on as many different surfaces.

Basically I work as fast as possible and then select the study that is the most satisfying from a design and color standpoint. (The less successful versions are disappeared to a CIA run black site). It's a marvelous way to work.

Deb said...

This blog is more fun that watching somebody trying to baptize a cat.

(a practice I don't necessarily condone, but it would be entertaining nonetheless, though perhaps not so much for the cat, in which case, I will go down on record as really a cat lover who simply pulled up an old Texas backwoods sayin' to express my feelings on this blog in a picturesque manner) There, PETA should be happy.

alotter said...

Ramalama, wipadudu bootie! Ut Ut--I hate to reveal how unwith-it I am, but what does that mean?

Richard J. Luschek II said...

Would you say that many of these loose painters became that way after having been through the process of working tight?
So, they had pushed paintings to a tighter finish, in their formative days, then as they got older and wiser were able to achieve their end faster and with less work.
I see a lot of painters trying to work this way before they should. Mistaking slovenly work, and bravura for truthiness.
Not really proclaiming, more just raising some points.
Your thoughts.

Deb said...

Richard, that's a great point. Reminds me of something Richard Schmid says, that "loose" is the way a painting should look, but not how it is actually painted. "
I think you're exactly right.

willek said...

algorythem= a method of birth control invented by the same guy who invented the internet.

Mary Byrom said...

Stapleton- Regarding snow painting- Vasari Ruby Violet is Scott's color of choice for your Cobalt Violet. Makes sense - both of you are using that red violet for the vibration.

mariandioguardi.com said...

Hey Mary,
Do you think I'd like Vasari Ruby Violet. I love saying it.
Will,
That's a good one..wish I thought of hat one too!

Just got back from a 24 Sci -Fi film marathon. Goodnight everyone

Tom said...

Hi Stape

Off topic with all this snow around when the sun is out all I see are blue shadows especially at the end of the day. I know people say it is reflected from the sky but what does that mean? And should we look for blue in the shadows in summer landscapes as well?

Mary Byrom said...

Marian, You'd most likely love Vasari Ruby Violet and some of the other Vasari colors as well - they are fine oil paints and expensive

Philip Koch said...

Holy Cow! There's no new post from Stapleton so far today.

This is akin to the sky falling in my book.

Hope all is ok and its just computers being bad causing the delay.

Wanted to comment also that the Gruppe painting in yesterday's post (the really loose harbor scene) looks very much like my friend and colleague from MICA Raoul Middleman's paintings.

Stapleton Kearns said...

Simone:
I think they usually have lower batting averages.
.................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Marian:
Alligorythem. Done in a place in France where ................
,...............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Honor;
Thats a great idea. I think it would be better to do 100 16 by 20's though all one shot.
............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Tim:
I am deliberately right in the middle.
I am the worlds tightest impressionist.
.....Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Ramalama, wipadudu bootie! Ut Ut
..................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

bill;
Rock and Roll is dead! Long live Rock and Roll!
.....Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Philip:
That sounds like a good way to work.
.......Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Deb:
Baptizing a cat is difficult, gotta reason with em.
................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

alotter;
That is not being revealed at this time.
.............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Richard:
I think that is usually the case.
............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Deb: That is a piece of great wisdom from a master.
................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Willek:
All gorhythm. I have no idea.
.............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Willek:
All gorhythm. I have no idea.
.............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Mary:
I wonder what that color is.
................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Marian:
I like named pigments, what is it? Is it dioxazine.
................Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Look for blue in the shadows. But it is the complement of the color of the light. You don't have to see it to user it though. It doesn't have to be right, it just has to look good.
..............Stape

Stapleton Kearns said...

Philip:
I couldn't get to an internet connection.
..................Stape